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  • Most people are wondering what the end of the sentence is when the Doctor was talking to Rose Tyler on Bad Wolf Bay, first he said "If it's my last chance to say it... Rose Tyler..." and then he disapeared (Episod: Doomsday). When she met him again when he was dropping her off at Bad Wolf Bay, she asked the Doctor and the human Doctor what the end on the sentence was, the Doctor said "Does it need saying?" and then the human Doctor whispered something in her ear and then she kissed him, I belive he said "I love you." because when the doctor disapered in the episode doomsday, it showed you him inside the TARDIS and he mouthed "I..." but then stopped. So it just proves that he was going to say "I love you."

    Episodes: Doomsday, Journeys End 

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    • Julie Gardner believes that's what he was going to say too. Unfortunately, since we never heard what was actually said, it can be open to interpretation.

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    • I think he was going to say I love you too.

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    • That was definitely the impression they wanted to give. I like to think he was going to say "I love you" to her, and I can't think what else would fit that situation, but since it wasn't said exactly, a future writer can change that unsaid line to be whatever they want it to be. But I like to think it was "I love you".

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    • Either that or he was going to say "Rose Tyler... Stop being a b**ch to Mickey".

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    • I thought The Doctor finished the phrase in Journey's End (or at least it said so on Dutch Wikipedia). Indeed, he said:"I love you."

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    • 83.134.19.205 wrote: I thought The Doctor finished the phrase in Journey's End (or at least it said so on Dutch Wikipedia). Indeed, he said:"I love you."

      I thought when she asked him in Journey's End, he just said, "Does it even need saying?" and then the other doctor whispered it in her ear.

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    • omg that's so sweet

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    • "Rose Tyler, will you marry me?" :) In the next episode, he gave a ring to Donna to protect her. The ring was in his pocket.

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    • 195.3.171.67 wrote:
      "Rose Tyler, will you marry me?" :)

      In the next episode, he gave a ring to Donna to protect her. The ring was in his pocket.

      Even if that ring does have the significance you suggest, by the time the Doctor was talking to Rose at Bad Wolf Bay, she was (as far as he knew) permanently separated from him. Proposing in those circumstances doesn't make sense. The Doctor does sometimes get humans wrong & say things that are hurtful, though he doesn't intend them to be. The Tenth Doctor, though, was much less inclined to do that than some other incarnations have been & even the most insensitive of the incarnations would have known enough not to make matters worse by making a proposal that could never be followed through.

      It's believable that the Doctor would want to say, "I love you," to Rose. Lovers who're permanently parted by force of circumstance often do tell each other that -- or "I will always love you" -- because each is reassuring the other that the love continues & has not been lost. A proposal or saying (in any form of words), "I wanted to marry you," would only emphasise what has been lost -- being together. The Doctor wouldn't have emphasised that loss to Rose, when she was already obviously heartbroken about it.

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    • A FANDOM user
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